Improve Morale of the Wisconsin’s Manufacturing Workforce

Wisconsin Manufacturing Employees want Engagement at Work According to a Gallup® poll of U.S. workers spanning 12 types of occupations, manufacturing employees came in dead last when it comes to being engaged at work. In fact, only one in four manufacturing workers report being engaged at work. What’s more, the survey found that production workers, 26 percent in fact, are among the most likely to be actively disengaged and emotionally disconnected from their work. So, why the disconnect? Multiple factors such as poor leadership, lack of skills, minimal experience, poor communication, and the lack of ownership style thinking within the workplace all help contribute to the disconnect. However, We know that companies with highly engaged, happy employees are reaping the benefits—they report: Higher productivity Better retention Lower costs And an overall healthier bottom line. Benefits of Happy Wisconsin Employees It likely goes without saying, but employees that are happy at work are reaping the benefits too. According to an article posted by the American Psychological Association®, employees who like their jobs are twice as likely to thrive in their overall lives—they have: Stronger relationships Better money management skills And, better overall health. Improved Manufacturing Production Happy employees also tend to be better producers—in part because they take fewer sick days but also because they tend to work both harder and smarter on the job. So it only makes sense that we’d want to dedicate time and resources toward boosting the morale of our Wisconsin workforce. Here are a few ideas you can use to improve the happiness of your workforce and in turn, your company’s bottom line. Simple ways...

What is Nanotechnology? What does it mean for me?

Nanotechnology is yet another buzzworthy topic for 2015 Relative to manufacturing, this multidisciplinary branch of science looks at engineering from a molecular or atomic level—more specifically on a nanoscale: one nanometer is equivalent to one billionth of a meter. An atom is even smaller yet … it’s about one tenth of a nanometer. In an essence, it takes extremely small bits of matter to engineer a part or end-product. Global Industry Analysts predict the nanotechnology market will exceed $30 billion in 2015. And according to Nanotechnology Market Outlook 2020, it is expected to grow at a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 16.5 percent between now and 2020. How does nanotechnology apply to manufacturing? And more importantly, why? Nanomanufacturing can help improve manufacturers’ products and processes. It can cut down on waste, improve efficiency, enhance durability and even create products that are not only stronger but also smaller and lighter-weight. Here’s how: Less waste: Bottom up manufacturing (at the nanoscale) versus the top down, there is less waste. Think of carving a sculpture out of a block of wood. Top down manufacturing produces a lot of wasted material (shavings, sawdust, etc.). When you build something from the bottom up, perhaps through methods such as additive manufacturing, there is little to no waste. Improved efficiency: Using nanotechnology, we can create finished products that require no machining, fabrication or assembly. Due to the bottom up approach of nanomanufacturing which cuts down on production time, lowers the cost of materials and labor and decreases the risk of rework. In addition, programming machine setups becomes unnecessary, parts can’t be fabricated incorrectly and an assembly line is...